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Blogger Profile


Juan

Blog Info

Name:
Finance Clever
Category:
General Finance
Tags:
Early Retirement, Frugality
Start Year:
2016

Blogger Bio

Location:
North Carolina, United States
Age:
20s
Race:
Hispanic
Gender:
Team
Life stage:
DIK (Dual Income, Kids)
Profession:
Accountant
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Latest Blog Posts

The first three months of 2017 were relatively uneventful compared to our action-packed 2016. We spent a lot of time at home with our little one, and I kept myself pretty busy with work, and studying for the last CPA exam, which I’m glad to say is behind me as I passed all 4 parts! Without further introduction, here are all of our expenses for the first three months of 2016! ...
Posted: Aug 17 2017 @ 5:40 PM
At this point in my life, I have read about a dozen books on money management and investing. I have found most of them to be fairly interesting and have learned a lot from them. But unfortunately, the great majority of sane people would find them boring and tedious, they are. I say unfortunately not because I want everybody to be a finance nerd like me, but because I believe that having a solid ...
Posted: Jul 18 2017 @ 7:00 PM
2016 was a really exiting year for us! We kicked off the year by traveling back to the U.S. after our wedding. A few months later I finished grad school, and attended Camp Mustache to kick off the summer. My dad came to visit us towards the end of the summer and we took him to the U.S. Open. As the fall season kicked in I started my new job, we bought ...
Posted: Jun 17 2017 @ 8:34 AM
A number of questions have come up from the post I wrote a few weeks ago about buying our new home. One of the most frequent ones goes something like this: “Great job outlining the costs of homeownership, but what about the benefits? I get a tax deduction for the interest and property taxes I pay on my home!” Today, we put the above statement to the test. Are potential tax deductions actually valuable for home owners? Of course we cannot ...
Posted: Jun 02 2017 @ 5:28 PM
About a year ago I wrote about how Elisa’s car has saved us $26,200 over 4 years. Today, we’ll explore the numbers behind my own car. As I am writing this sentence, I have not yet run the numbers so I am excited to see how my car’s cost of ownership compares to Elisa’s. I bought this car back in 2011 when I moved to Greensboro, NC for graduate school. I ...
Posted: May 25 2017 @ 6:26 PM
One of the most common misconceptions out there is the notion that buying a home is always a better financial decision than renting one. This is nonsense. “Always” is rarely a good answer in the world of personal finance. There are too many factors at play for one alternative to always trump the other ones. A common argument in favor of buying that clearly overlooks many important factors goes something like this: “my mortgage payment would ...
Posted: Feb 15 2017 @ 10:49 AM
Who are the rich in this country? What do they do? How did they get rich? Can I become one of them? The Millionaire Next Door provides some very interesting and, perhaps, surprising answers to these questions. The authors, Dr. Stanley and Dr. Danko, are two academics who have dedicated much of their time to study millionaires, and the research behind this book is very comprehensive. The opening paragraph of ...
Posted: Aug 15 2016 @ 6:46 PM
Over the last few weeks I have been buried studying for the CPA exam. I finally seem to be slightly ahead of schedule, so I thought I would take some time to write an update on this year’s spending so far. During the first quarter of 2016, we came back to the U.S. shortly after celebrating our wedding in Colombia. Other than that it was a rather inconspicuous quarter as ...
Posted: Aug 07 2016 @ 4:40 PM
Saving and investing are two key elements to reach financial independence. In this post I review one of the best books about investing I have read so far: A Random Walk Down Wall Street – The Time-Tested Strategy for Successful Investing. I believe this is a good read for any curious mind looking to improve their understanding of money and investing. Burton G. Malkiel, the author, has a great deal ...
Posted: Jul 18 2016 @ 5:32 PM
Financial independence… That wonderful thing that happens when your passive income equals or exceeds your expenses. It takes a sizable amount of money to get there. How much exactly? 25 times your annual expenses using the 4% percent withdrawal rule. For me, annual expenses are about $29,000, so I would need at least a $725,000 portfolio in order to reach financial independence. In other words, the ultimate freedom costs $725,000 ...
Posted: Jul 11 2016 @ 6:18 PM

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